Information

2-5 October 2017
Application start 9 February 2017
Application end 2 September 2017
Application end / With visa 2 July 2017
Fee: 1230

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Human Rights and Land Grabbing

Somalia, Beledweyne. A herder stands with his goats at a nearby water point Somalia, Beledweyne. A herder stands with his goats at a nearby water point

What is the human rights impact of land grabbing? How have United Nations (UN) human rights mechanisms responded to the phenomenon? What forms of protection are currently being provided under international law in relation to the right to land, as well as for land rights defenders? What mechanisms are available to monitor and remedy human rights violations associated with land grabbing at the national or regional levels?

This training course provides participants with an in-depth examination of the complex relationship between human rights and land grabbing. The course focuses on the impact of land grabbing on the rights to food, water, housing, and work, and on the protection of land rights defenders, who are among those most at risk of being arbitrarily arrested or killed.

Participants will be provided with information on the ongoing negotiation process to elaborate a UN declaration on the rights of peasants and other people working in rural areas, which contains provisions on the right to land.

They will have opportunities to meet with experts based in Geneva, notably during the expert seminar on the rights of peasants which will be held at the UN on the day after the training course.

Programme

The training course covers the following issues:

  • The normative content of human rights affected by land grabbing, in particular economic, social and cultural rights, and the obligations of States related to these rights
  • Human rights impact of land grabbing
  • Human rights responses to land grabbing
  • The protection of human rights defenders in the context of land grabbing
  • Role of UN mechanisms in monitoring human rights violations associated with land grabbing (Human Rights Council, special procedures and treaty bodies)
  • Access to justice at the national and regional levels
  • History and current status of the negotiation process for the drafting of a UN Declaration on the rights of peasants and other people working in rural areas
  • The recognition of the right to land in the draft UN Declaration on the rights of peasants and other people working in rural areas
  • Discussions with experts, civil society representatives, and diplomats negotiating the draft UN Declaration.

Objectives

At the end of this course, participants will be:

  • Familiar with the content of human rights affected by land grabbing, in particular economic, social and cultural rights, and States’ obligations related to these rights
  • Able to identify and effectively describe human rights violations associated with land grabbing
  • Knowledgeable about human rights responses to land grabbing, as well as the protection of human rights defenders under international law
  • Knowledgeable about the role played by UN mechanisms in monitoring human rights violations associated with land grabbing (Human Rights Council, special procedures and treaty bodies)
  • Familiar with the negotiation taking place at the Human Rights Council to elaborate a UN Declaration on the rights of peasants and other people working in rural areas
  • Knowledgeable about the content of the draft UN Declaration
  • Able to discuss challenges in the recognition of the right to land in the UN Declaration.

Expert Seminar

Participants are invited to attend the expert seminar on the rights of peasants, which will be held at the UN on Friday 6 October 2017, 9:00-17:30 (free of charge).

Certification

Participants who successfully complete the training course receive a certificate of participation from the Geneva Academy.

Fee

The training fee for this four-day programme is 1,230 Swiss Francs (30 percent discount for PhD and master students).

The fee includes tuition costs, course materials, 4 lunches, and refreshments during coffee breaks.

The fee is payable as soon as your place has been confirmed, and at the latest 3 weeks before the start of the course (11 September 2017).

All participants are responsible for their own travel costs to Geneva, including Swiss visa fees and evening meals (approximately 30 Swiss Francs per meal).

Accommodation

Participants can request on-campus accommodation via the online application form. Due to the limited places available, accommodation is not guaranteed. Participants seeking on-campus accommodation are encouraged to request it as soon as possible.

How to Apply

Applications must be submitted via the online application form.
If you encounter problems with your application, do not hesitate to contact us.

Practical Information

Language of instruction: English

If you have any questions, please email rightsofpeasants[at]geneva-academy.ch

Professors and Lecturers

Picture of Adriana Bessa

Adriana Bessa

Research Fellow

Adriana Bessa's research areas include the rights of traditional local communities, the draft declaration on the rights of peasants and the right to food.

Picture of Joanna Bourke Martignoni

Joanna Bourke Martignoni

Research Fellow

Joanna Bourke Martignoni's research areas include the right to food, land commercialization, climate change, the right to education and gender equality.

Picture of Christophe Golay

Christophe Golay

Research Fellow and Strategic Adviser on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights

Christophe Golay's expertise notably relates to economic, social and cultural rights (ESCR) and the rights of peasants.

Location

 Villa Moynier, 120B Rue de Lausanne, Geneva

Access

Public Transport

Tram 15, Direction Nations - tram stop Butini

Bus 1 or 25, Direction Jardin Botanique - bus stop Sécheron

Access for people with disabilities

Villa Moynier is accessible to people with disabilities. If you have a disability or any additional needs and require assistance in order to participate fully, please email info[at]geneva-academy.ch

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