Information

September 2018 - August 2018
Application start 20 November 2017
Application end 28 February 2018
Application end (with scholarship) 31 January 2018

Course Catalogue

International Criminal Law: Case Law and Judicial Practice

Guido Acquaviva

The system of international criminal justice includes the International Criminal Court and several other institutions – international, domestic, regional and ‘hybrid’. These institutions mostly ‘speak’ through case law. The course will focus on exploring the major themes of this case law in areas such as jurisdiction, substantive crimes (war crimes, crimes against humanity, genocide, terrorism), criminal responsibility and major procedural milestones in criminal proceedings. It will also address topics such as the nature and modalities of judicial deliberations and the assignment of judges to cases before courts and tribunals dealing with international crimes.

Preventing and Combating Terrorism

Gloria Gaggioli

Since the 9.11 attacks, and with the multiplication of terrorist attacks on European soil, terrorism is considered one of the most important security threats the international community has to face. To what extent may states limit and/or derogate from their international human rights obligations in order to prevent and counter terrorism and thus protect persons under their jurisdiction? Which and whose human rights are at risk when states fight terrorism? What are the human rights challenges posed by the United Nations counter-terrorist sanctions regime? In which circumstances may lethal force – including drone strikes – be used against alleged members of terrorist groups or so-called ‘lone wolves’? Which international law rules apply in relation to the internment/detention and interrogation of persons accused of terrorism? These are some of the key issues discussed in this course, addressing several rights including the right to life, the right to liberty, the prohibition of torture, the right to property, and freedom of movement. Although the course is mainly human rights oriented, other international legal frameworks such as jus ad bellum and international humanitarian law will be touched upon. Recent trends in counter-terrorism, such as the preventing and countering violent extremism agenda, will be discussed in light of their human rights impact.

Peacebuilding in Post-Conflict and Fragile Situations

Tarcisio Gazzini

This course provides a concise and systematic treatment of the peacebuilding process in post-conflict and fragile situations. It adopts a holistic definition of peacebuilding that combines the socio-political issues with economic growth in a sustainable development perspective.It also focuses on the roles and interests of the different stakeholders involved as well as on the concepts of ownership and inclusiveness. The course critically examines the achievements and failures of the UN Peacebuilding Commission established in 2005, taking into account the report of the UN Advisory Group of Experts delivered in 2015. The course finally considers the economic dimension of the process from the standpoint of governments, international organizations, donors and financial institutions.

The Rule of Law in Practice

Nicolas Mansfield

What is ‘the rule of law’ and why is it considered important for economic and democratic development? How has rule of law development assistance evolved over the last half-century and what are its antecedents? How are rule of law programmes designed, what are their typical components, and how is their impact measured? This course considers rule of law work from the perspective of the practitioner, using case studies, procurement documents and project reports to help students understand how rule of law projects are developed and implemented in the field. The course also considers scholarly critiques of rule of law assistance, allowing students to evaluate the operational features of such assistance within a broader analytical framework.