Human Rights in the Digital Age

Started in January 2014

The digital age offers unique opportunities to strengthen human rights implementation and monitoring and has transformed the means through which human rights are exercised. Equally, the digital age poses unique challenges in ensuring that states and businesses respect and protect our rights in the digital forum. The full extent of the human rights implications of the digital age remain unknown; we are undertaking research to explore these implications.

Human Rights, Big Data and Technology Project

The Geneva Academy is a partner of the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC)-funded Human Rights, Big Data and Technology Project, based at the University of Essex’s Human Rights Centre. HRBDT maps and analyzes the challenges and opportunities presented by the use of technology and big data from a human rights perspective. Drawing on the wide range of expertise of its interdisciplinary researchers, the project considers whether fundamental human rights concepts and approaches need to be adapted to meet the rapidly evolving technological landscape. The work brings together practitioners in the fields of human rights, technology and Internet governance, the United Nations, technology industries and academics, to assess existing regulatory responses and the need for reforms in order to maximize effective human rights enjoyment and protection.

The Right to Privacy in the Digital Age

In 2014, in partnership with the Permanent Missions of Austria, Brazil, Germany, Liechtenstein, Mexico, Norway, and Switzerland, the Geneva Academy hosted the experts meeting ‘The Right to Privacy in the Digital Age’. The meeting was held to: examine the international human rights law framework in relation to the right to privacy, and identify challenges raised by modern communication technologies; foster understanding of how the right to privacy is implemented by governments, as well as the private sector and civil society; examine the extent to which domestic and extraterritorial surveillance may infringe an individual’s right to privacy; and identify ways forward to ensure the protection and promotion of the right to privacy.

RESEARCHER

Picture of Alice Priddy

Alice Priddy

Researcher

Alice Priddy's current main research areas concern the rights of persons with disabilities during and in the immediate aftermath of armed conflict.

MORE ON THIS THEMATIC AREA

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Use of Force in Law Enforcement and the Right to Life: The Role of the UN Human Rights Council

November 2016

Our new publication examines how the right to life is affected by law enforcement agencies’ use of force and identifies how the HRC could further promote respect for international standards governing policing.

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News

Autonomous Weapon Systems: Legality under International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights

May 2017

Our new publication Defending the Boundary analyses the constraints and requirements on the use of autonomous weapon systems (AWS), also called ‘killer robots’, under international humanitarian law and international human rights law.

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Syria, Aleppo, Sheikh Massoud neighbourhood, near the frontline. Fighters of the Free Syrian Army. Project

‘Foreign Fighters’ and Counter-Terrorism

Started in January 2014

Against the background of the mobilization of ‘foreign fighters’ for the conflicts in Syria and Iraq, the Geneva Academy undertook various research projects to highlight and clarify a range of international law issues that arise through their participation and measures taken to stem their mobilization.

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Peru, Lima. Anti-riot policemen during a demonstration. Project

Current Human Rights Challenges

Started in January 2015

This initiative aims at creating a platform allowing leading academics, experts and practitioners who work on right to life issues. It also develops research identifying and discussing some of the cutting-edge development as far as this seminal right is concerned, in the human rights, humanitarian law and the violence reduction contexts.

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