The Intersection between Transitional Justice, International Security and Responsibility to Protect

Started in February 2017

Security interests and humanitarian objectives as part of the responsibility to protect framework are fuelling military interventions whether within or outside the United Nations collective security system. Such foreign interventions raise major challenges for the design, legitimacy and local ownership of transitional justice processes that are limited to the accountability of local actors and towards local communities.

How can foreign interveners be held accountable? And to whom? These are key questions to be answered when analysing the intersection between transitional justice, international security and responsibility to protect. This project maps various existing accountability mechanisms through the lens of the requirements of a transitional justice process in order to identify possibilities and gaps.

Research outputs will be published by the end of 2017.

RESEARCHER

Picture of Sandra Krähenmann

Sandra Krähenmann

Research Fellow

Sandra Krähenmann's research focuses on the theory and practice of international law that applies in armed conflict and other situations of violence.

Publications

Cover of the book Post-Conflict Peacebuilding A Lexicon

Post-Conflict Peacebuilding - A Lexicon

January 2009

Vincent Chetail

Oxford University Press

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MORE ON THIS THEMATIC AREA

Mexico, two persons walk in th street at night IHL Talks

Armed gang violence: at the crossroad between armed conflict and law enforcement?

December 2017, 12:00-14:00

This IHL Talk will address the political, sociological and legal dimensions of the issue of armed gang violence in Latin America, notably in Mexico, El Salvador and Colombia.

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North Kivu province, Kitchanga downtown. The insanitary conditions next to the market worsens the situation of the residents affected by the recent violence. Short Course

The Interplay between International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights

1- March 2018

This course focuses on the specific issues that arise in times of armed conflict regarding the respect, protection and fulfilment of human rights. It addresses key issues like the applicability of human rights in times of armed conflict; the possibilities of restricting human rights under systems of limitations and derogations; and the extraterritorial application of human rights law.

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Drawing of soldiers on a wall Short Course

Human Rights, the Rule of Law and Institutional Reform

Spring 2018

This course explores the international dimension of the rule of law and its promotion in transitional contexts, focusing on institutional reform and guarantees of non-recurrence. The course also looks at the role of the international community and civil society in rule of law reform.

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U.S. Army Soldiers from the 101st Airborne based at Fort Campbell, Ky., protect the Project

The International Code of Conduct for Private Security Service Providers

Completed in January 2008

The International Code of Conduct for Private Security Providers is the result of an active collaboration between members of the private security industry, the Geneva Academy, Swiss Department of Foreign Affairs and Geneva Centre for the Democratic Control of Armed Forces (DCAF).

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A computer graphic simulation of a Future Protected Vehicle Project

Autonomous Weapon Systems under International Humanitarian and Human Rights Law

Completed in January 2015

This project examined the legal requirements that the use of autonomous weapon systems would need to comply with in a number of scenarios envisaged by proponents of increasing autonomy in weapon systems.

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