The Intersection between Transitional Justice, International Security and Responsibility to Protect

Started in February 2017

Security interests and humanitarian objectives as part of the responsibility to protect framework are fuelling military interventions whether within or outside the United Nations collective security system. Such foreign interventions raise major challenges for the design, legitimacy and local ownership of transitional justice processes that are limited to the accountability of local actors and towards local communities.

How can foreign interveners be held accountable? And to whom? These are key questions to be answered when analysing the intersection between transitional justice, international security and responsibility to protect. This project maps various existing accountability mechanisms through the lens of the requirements of a transitional justice process in order to identify possibilities and gaps.

Research outputs will be published by the end of 2017.

RESEARCHER

Picture of Sandra Krähenmann

Sandra Krähenmann

Senior Research Fellow

Sandra Krähenmann's research focuses on the theory and practice of international law that applies in armed conflict and other situations of violence.

MORE ON THIS THEMATIC AREA

Syria, Aleppo, Sheikh Massoud neighbourhood, near the frontline. Fighters of the Free Syrian Army. Project

‘Foreign Fighters’ and Counter-Terrorism

Started in January 2014

Against the background of the mobilization of ‘foreign fighters’ for the conflicts in Syria and Iraq, the Geneva Academy undertook various research projects to highlight and clarify a range of international law issues that arise through their participation and measures taken to stem their mobilization.

Read more

Libya, Misrata, Tripoli Street. Combattants carefully move into a building. Project

Armed Non-State Actors and the Protection of Civilians

Completed in March 2010

This research project looked at the reactions to norms of more than 30 armed groups worldwide.

Read more