Counterpiracy under International Law

Completed in December 2013

This project conducted legal research into modern forms of piracy and the international community’s response to it, through naval patrols and the use of private security personnel.

On 30 January–1 February 2012 the Geneva Academy and Geneva Centre for the Democratic Control of Armed Forces (DCAF) held a Wilton Park conference on the issue. The conference brought together more than 40 experts to discuss whether an adequate normative and policy framework exists to regulate the conduct of states and private security service providers when they act to prevent piracy. The conference focused on legal issues, with particular reference to the situation off the coast of Somalia.

TEAM

Picture of Alice Priddy

Alice Priddy

Researcher

Alice Priddy's current main research areas concern the rights of persons with disabilities during and in the immediate aftermath of armed conflict.

Picture of Stuart Casey-Maslen

Stuart Casey-Maslen

OUTPUT

Academy Briefing No. 1, Counterpiracy under International Law (September 2012), describes the international legal framework applying to counterpiracy, including the law of the sea, the use of force at sea, relevant international human rights law and its application to states, private security companies and suspected pirates.

As part of this research project, the Geneva Academy also contributed actively to the standard on maritime security of the American Society for Industrial Security (ASIS International), helping to ensure that the standard is compliant with international human rights law. The American National Standards Institute (ANSI) has approved the Quality Assurance and Security Management for Private Security Companies Operating at Sea standard as an American National Standard.

Publications

Cover of the Briefing No1: Counterpiracy Under International Law

Briefing N°1: Counterpiracy Under International Law

August 2012

Stuart Casey-Malsen, Andrew Clapham, Alice Priddy

Geneva Academy of International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights

Download >

MORE ON THIS THEMATIC AREA

Police intervention during a demonstration Project

Non-Kinetic-Energy Weapons

Completed in January 2009

Non-kinetic-energy (NKE) weapons inflict harm through the emission of different forms of radiation or sound, diffusion of chemical or biological agents or transmission of electricity, rather than the application of kinetic energy possessed by a fragment, bullet or other projectile.

Read more

A Royal Air Force Reaper RPAS (Remotely Piloted Air System) at Kandahar Airfield in Afghanistan Project

Armed Drones and Autonomous Weapon Systems under International Law

Completed in January 2011

This project aimed in particular to address the legal and ethical challenges these new technologies pose in relation to the regulation of the use of force.

Read more