Rules of Engagement

Completed in December 2011

This project looked at how to enhance compliance by armed non-state actors with international norms, taking into account the views both of the actors themselves and the experiences of those engaged in dialogue with them.

Research Team

This research project was carried out by Annyssa Bellal and Stuart Casey-Maslen.

OUTPUT

The resulting report, Rules of Engagement: Protecting Civilians through Dialogue with Armed Non-State Actors, was published in October 2011 in English, French and Spanish. It proposes ten ‘policy rules’ that notably call for a greater and systematic engagement with ANSAs as well as a clarification of the legal framework applicable to these actors. It also suggests the development of a model international code of conduct to explicitly apply to the behaviour of ANSAs.

This three-year study took into account the feedback of academics, governments, international and non-governmental organizations as well as ANSAs themselves and was cited by the UN Secretary-General in his 2010 Report on the Protection of Civilians in Armed Conflict. The Secretary-General relied on our research findings to explain the different incentives influencing ANSAs to better respect international law.

Publications

Cover of the Rules of Engagement: Protecting Civilians through Dialogue with Armed Non-State Actors

Rules of Engagement: Protecting Civilians through Dialogue with Armed Non-State Actors

October 2011

Geneva Academy of International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights

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Cover of Règles d'engagement - La protection des civils à travers un dialogue avec les acteurs armés non étatiques

Règles d'engagement - La protection des civils à travers un dialogue avec les acteurs armés non étatiques

October 2011

Geneva Academy of International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights

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Cover of Reglas del Juego - Cómo Proteger a los Civiles mediante el diálogo con los actores armados no estatales

Reglas del Juego - Cómo proteger a los civiles mediante el diálogo con los actores armados no estatales

October 2011

Geneva Academy of International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights

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