A Geneva Academy Team Will Participate in the 2017 Nuremberg Moot Court

Geneva Academy team with their coaches Geneva Academy team with their coaches

29 May 2017

From 26 to 29 July 2017, a Geneva Academy team will be one of 42 teams coming from 27 countries participating in the 2017 Nuremberg Moot Court.

The team is made of students from our LLM in International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights (LLM) and our Master of Advanced Studies in Transitional Justice, Human Rights and the Rule of Law (MTJ). It is coached by Tom Gal and Antonio Coco, Teaching Assistants at the Geneva Academy and PhD students at the Law Faculty, University of Geneva.

During four days, Tafadzwa Christmas (MTJ), Elena Piasentin (LLM), Lina Rodriguez (MTJ), Caroline Siewert (LLM) and Thomas Van Poecke (LLM) will have to address complex procedural and substantive issues of international criminal law.

‘Nuremberg has been at the centre of the creation of international criminal law as we know it today. Pleading in this historic environment is a unique opportunity and reminds us of the reasons why we need this branch of law’ stresses Caroline Siewert.

‘For me, the Nuremberg Moot Court is a way to complement my experience at the Geneva Academy by immersing myself in the field of international criminal law in a practical manner. The fact that I can do so together with team members of diverse backgrounds makes the project even more rewarding’ underlines Thomas Van Poecke.

‘The Nuremberg Moot Court is a great opportunity to apply the students' knowledge of international criminal law to a fictive case, improving at the same time their interpersonal and presentation skills. With regard to the Geneva Academy specifically, for the first time students from two different programmes – the LLM and the MTJ – will have a chance to work together as a team. It will be a highly formative experience for all of them’ underline Tom Gal and Antonio Coco.

First Participation

It is the first time that the Geneva Academy participates in the Nuremberg Moot Court. Participation in moot courts forms an integral part of the LLM and MTJ. It allows students to put in practice what they’ve learned throughout the year.

‘Interacting with students from different disciplines allows me to put into practice the knowledge I gained during the year at the Geneva Academy. As a team we take a holistic approach and we join efforts when dealing with a practical case, which is a very enriching experience’ underlines Lina Rodriguez.

‘Participation in this moot court allows us to put into practice what we've learned during the year, with each of us bringing their specific contribution to the team. For me personally, it represents an important commitment and a challenge I undertook to gain more confidence in myself’ stresses Elena Piasentin.

Nuremberg Moot Court 2017

About the Nuremberg Moot Court

The Nuremberg Moot Court is organized by the International Nuremberg Principles Academy and the Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nürnberg. It is held in Courtroom 600 of the Nuremberg Palace of Justice, where the famous Post-World War II trials took place.

The Nuremberg Moot Court Competition preserves this legacy of the fight against impunity, promoting and implementing the knowledge of international criminal law and the Nuremberg Principles, which are the foundation of criminal courts worldwide.

The Moot Court takes place every summer. Teams from around the world gather together to present their legal briefs before a panel of judges, comprised of world-renowned experts. Each team presents either as the prosecution or the defence. Teams are evaluated for the content of their briefs as well as their presentation skills, team work and spirit.

MORE ON THIS THEMATIC AREA

Professor Fionnuala Ni Aolain at the TJ Cafe, next to the Co-Director of the MAS in Transitional Justice Thomas Unger and the Teaching Assistant Firouzeh Mitchell News

Key Expert Discusses the Links between Transitional Justice, Security and Counterterrorism with our Students

7 March 2019

As part of our Transitional Justice Café series, Professor Fionnuala Ni Aolain discussed with students of our MAS in Transitional Justice, Human Rights and the Rule of Law the links between transitional justice, security and counterterrorism.

Read more

Portrait of Professor Andrew Clapham News

Professor Andrew Clapham Will Serve on the UN Commission on Human Rights in South Sudan

25 September 2017

The President of the UN Human Rights Council appointed Professor Andrew Clapham to serve as a member of the UN Commission on Human Rights in South Sudan charged with monitoring and assessing the human rights situation in the country.

Read more

Logo of the Atlas Network Event

Women's Perspectives on a Career in International Law

18 December 2019, 12:30-14:00

This event, co-organized with the ATLAS Network will feature prominent women in international law. Coming from different professional backgrounds, they will share their experience and advice through an interactive discussion.

Read more

Ntaganda case: Closing statements.  The closing statements in the case of The Prosecutor v. Bosco Ntaganda at the International Criminal Court (ICC) started on 28 August 2018 before Trial Chamber VI at the seat of the Court in The Hague (Netherlands). Short Course

The Challenges of International Criminal Justice

9-24 January 2020

This short course intends to provide participants with a solid understanding of the existing pluralistic system of international accountability for international crimes and of its main challenges.

Read more

Honduras, Tegucigalpa, Central Park. A pedestrian is looking at portraits of missing persons during the International Day of Missing Persons. Returned migrants and relatives of the missing painted a moveable mural. Short Course

Confronting the Truth: The Functions, Practices and Challenges of Truth Commissions

31 March - 2 April 2020

Truth Commissions are by now an integral part of the transitional justice vocabulary and practice. This short course will provide a comprehensive, multidimensional and practical examination of this transitional justice mechanism, shedding light on both its aims and the practical challenges it has met or is likely to meet.

Read more

UN Peacekeepers on Patrol in Abyei, Sudan Project

Post-Conflict Peacebuilding

Completed in January 2005

This research project aimed to clarify the multiple facets of post-conflict peacebuilding.

Read more

Peru, Ayacucho. An event to honor the disappeared on the Day of the Dead. Project

The United Nations Principles to Combat Impunity: A Commentary

Completed in January 2013

As a comprehensive attempt to ‘codify’ universal accountability norms, the UN Principles marked a significant step forward in the debate on the obligation of states to combat impunity in its various forms. Despite this significance, no comprehensive academic commentary of the 38 principles has yet been provided so far. This project seeks to fill this gap.

Read more